Archive for Afro Arab

Asiatic Afro-Arabs of Africa: North Africa-Ifriqiya* / Horn of Africa and SouthWest Asia.. (Nubians, Tuareg and Beja “Sahara” People)

Posted in Afro Arabs, Nomadic, North Africa, Nubians, Sahara, Tuareg with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 28, 2009 by Biléh* Gambéla በላይ ። ጋምበላ🇺🇸🇸🇩🇨🇻

afroasiatic-westasia-map

nubian-lil-girls1
800px-nomad-tuaregs Afro-Asiatic Arabs of Africa..

Afro-Arab (sometimes referred to as African Arab) refers to people who possess both African and/or Arab ancestry. In addition, it may refer to Arabs who are not descended from recent African ancestry, but who live on the African continent.

There are large communities of Afro-Arabs in East Africa, North -Africa and Nile Valley Regions

West-Asia’s Middle east, and  through recent migrations, Western Europe.

The phrase Afro-Arab may also refer to African Union efforts to improve co-operation between Africa and countries of the Arab world.

Tuareg Barber and Tuareg Teen... Afro-Asiatic Family

The Arabs of the Middle East have very old connections to the African continent, and in addition more than half the Arab world now exists in Africa (in terms of area, and possibly population too), i.e. from

Egypt and Sudan in the east to Mauritania in the west, although much of the North African population are Berbers (a separate, native ethnic group speaking an Afro-Asiatic language) or Arabized Berbers.

The Islamic world covers even more area, ie. /Niger Sahara and Nigeria in the west and many other West African nations too.

So this intermingling of peoples from the African continent, along with the spread of Islam, has resulted in Large Populations of African Arab peoples covering a vast area of Africa and Asia.

Present-day Sudan is home to millions of Arabs, with 40% of the population identifying themselves,

Under the ethnic group of ‘Arabs’ Even though the option of ‘Afro-Arabs’ is also available…

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Nubian.Woman with Henna Tattoos from Aswan Upper Egypt

Afro-Arabs within West Asia’s Middle East itself are for the most part descendants of

Black African slaves who were brought there during the Arab slave trade.

Saudi Arabia, Oman, UAE, Kuwait, Bahrain and Qatar as well East Africa hosts a significant Afro-Arab population

Along the Swahili Coast, such as in Zanzibar, Mombasa, Lamu, Malindi, the Comoros, Bagamoyo, and Ujiji.

 'Antarah Ibn Shaddād al-'Absī عنترة بن شداد العبسي

‘Antarah Ibn Shaddād al-‘Absī عنترة بن شداد العبسي

One of the most famous Afro Arabs of ancient times was the Pre Islamic Hero like figure Antar Ibn Shadded.

Antarah Ibn Shaddād al-‘Absī عنترة بن شداد العبسي was a pre-Islamic Arab hero and poet  born (525-608) famous for both his poetry and his adventurous life. What many consider his best or chief poem is contained in the Mu’allaqat. The account of his life forms the basis of a long and extravagant romance.

Antar was in Laiwa, He was born the son of Shaddād, a well respected member of the Arabian tribe of BanuAbs, and of Zabaibah,

An Ethiopian Female whom Shaddad had Enslaved after a Tribal War.

The tribe neglected Antar at first, and he grew up in servitude.

Although it was fairly obvious that Shaddad was his father, his

Ethiopian Dark Skin made it easier to classify him among the African-Asiatic slaves.

Antara claimed attention and respect for himself by his remarkable personal qualities and courage in battle, excelling as an accomplished poet and a mighty warrior. In 1898 the French painter Étienne Dinet published his translation of a 13th-century epic Arab poem Antar which brought Antar bin Shaddad to European notice.[2] It has been followed by a number of derivative works such as Diana Richmond’s Antar and Abla which furthered western exposure to the Antar bin Shaddad legends.

(Antarah ibn Shaddad)

The Zanj Rebellions took place near the city of Basra, located in southern Iraq over a period of fifteen years (869-883 AD). They grew to involve over 500,000 slaves who were imported from across the Muslim empire and claimed over “tens of thousands of lives in lower Iraq” .

The major revolt is said to have been led by Ali ibn Muhammad,

Who claimed to be a descendent of Caliph Ali ibn Abu Talib.

Not all part takers in the Zanj revolt where of Black African descent,

Many where Slaves of Indian, Iranian and of Slavic ancestry.

The majority that where forced to work in the Iraqi salt marshes where however of Zanj (East African Bantu) Ancestry

Because the East European Slavs would simply die in the humid heat of the salt marshes.

It is believed that many of today’s Basra area “Afro Arabs” are Descending from one of these Zanj Groups though many May have settled that area under different circumstances via the Arab-African.

In Medieval HistoryIfriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabicإفريقية‎) was the area comprising the coastal regions of what are today western LibyaTunisia, and Eastern Algeria.

This area included what had been the Roman province of Africa, whose name it inherited

Ifriqiya was bounded on the south by the semi-arid areas and salt marshes called el-Djerid. At various times, the rulers of this area also conquered Sicily and parts of mainland Italy, and the western boundary was in continual flux but usually went as far as Bejaia.

Its Capital was Qayrawan (Kairouan) in Central Tunisia.

Arabic Thought and its Place in History, De Lacy O’Leary, London: Kegan, Paul [1922], p. 227-8 says: “Gradually the Arabs spread all along North Ifriqiya*/Africa and down to the desert edge, their tribes as a rule occupying the lower ground, whilst the older population had its chief centres in the mountainous districts.

During the invasion of 45 (A.H.) the city of Kairouan (Qairouan, Qayrawan) was founded some distance south of Tunis.

The site was badly chosen, and is now marked only by ruins and a scanty village, but for some centuries it served as the capital city of Ifrikiya, which was the name given to the province lying next to Egypt, embracing the modern states of Tripoli, Tunis, and the Eastern part of Algeria up to the meridian of Bougie.”

From their base in Kairouan the Aghlabids Conquered Sicily, beginning in 827 and establishing the Emirate of Sicily, which lasted until it was displaced by the Normans, effecting lasting changes in Sicilian culture.

Nubian la bezza

Nomadic

Arabs

Etymology of the word Arab

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Sources

  • Ibn KhaldunHistoire des Berbères et des dynasties musulmanes de l’Afrique; traduite de l’arabe par le baron de Slane; nouv. éd / pub. sous la direction de Paul Casanova, et suivie d’une bibliographie d’Ibn Khaldoun. 4 vols. Paris: P. Geuthner, 1925-34.
  • Julien, Charles-André, Histoire de l’Afrique du Nord, des origines à 1830, édition originale Paris: Payot, 1931, réédition Payot, Paris, 1961


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The DNA Bill “S.1858” Nobody Noticed… So what’s your Dna Ethnic Origin ?

Posted in afri asiatic, Dna Bill S.1858 ( Biometrics), National DNA Database in the U.S.A, Nubians with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2009 by Biléh* Gambéla በላይ ። ጋምበላ🇺🇸🇸🇩🇨🇻

 

Ayana Is a Amharic Ethiopian Name that means Beautiful Flower/Blossom

Ayana Is a Amharic Ethiopian Name that means Beautiful Flower/Blossom

 

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The Bill Nobody Noticed: National DNA Databank

S.1858, known as The Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act of 2007, is justified as a “national contingency plan” in that it represents preparation for any sort of public health emergency. The bill states that the federal government should “continue to carry out, coordinate, and expand research in newborn screening” and “maintain a central clearinghouse of current information on newborn screening… ensuring that the clearinghouse is available on the Internet and is updated at least quarterly”. Sections of the bill also make it clear that DNA may be used in genetic experiments and tests. Read the full bill: http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xp…

Twila Brase, president of the Citizens’ Council on Health Care warns that this new law represents the beginning of nationwide genetic testing. Brase states that S.1858 and H.R. 3825, the House version of the bill, will:

• Establish a national list of genetic conditions for which newborns and children are to be tested.

• Establish protocols for the linking and sharing of genetic test results nationwide.

• Build surveillance systems for tracking the health status and health outcomes of individuals diagnosed at birth with a genetic defect or trait.

• Use the newborn screening program as an opportunity for government agencies to identify, list, and study “secondary conditions” of individuals and their families.

• Subject citizens to genetic research without their knowledge or consent.

Ayana Is a Amharic Ethiopian Name that means Beautiful Flower/Blossom

Read her entire analysis of the implications of this bill here :http://www.cchconline.org/pdf/S_1858_NB…

Brase states that under this bill, ”The DNA taken at birth from every citizen is essentially Owned by the Government”, and “Every Citizen born becomes a potential subject of Government-Sponsored Genetic Research. All 50 states are now routinely providing results of genetic screenings to the Department of Homeland Security and this bill will establish the legality of that practice plus include DNA.

Ron Paul has also vigorously argued against this bill making the following comments before the US House of Representatives:

I cannot support legislation…that exceeds the Constitutional limitations on federal power or in any way threatens the liberty of the American people. I must oppose it.

S. 1858 gives the federal bureaucracy the authority to develop a model newborn screening program. Madame Speaker, the federal government lacks both the constitutional authority and the competence to develop a newborn screening program adequate for a nation as large and diverse as the United States. …”

“Those of us in the medical profession should be particularly concerned about policies allowing government officials and state-favored interests to access our medical records without our consent …

My review of S. 1858 indicates the drafters of the legislation made no effort to ensure these newborn screening programs do not violate the privacy rights of parents and children, in fact, by directing federal bureaucrats to create a contingency plan for newborn screening in the event of a ‘public health’ disaster, this bill may lead to further erosions of medical privacy.

As recent history so eloquently illustrates, politicians are more than willing to take, and people are more than willing to cede, liberty during times of ‘emergency.”

http://www.cchconline.org/pdf/S_1858_NB…

http://infowars.net/articles/may2008/02Ayana Is a Amharic Ethiopian Name that means Beautiful Flower/Blossom

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Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples… Who are the indigenous ?

Posted in Declaration of the Rights of indigenous people, Human Rights with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2009 by Biléh* Gambéla በላይ ። ጋምበላ🇺🇸🇸🇩🇨🇻

Nubian lil Girl and Elder copy

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly during its 62nd session at UN Headquarters in New York City on 13 September 2007.

While as a General Assembly Declaration it is not a legally binding instrument under international law,

according to a UN press release, it does “represent the dynamic development of international legal norms and it reflects the commitment of the UN’s member states to move in certain directions”; the UN describes it as setting “an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool towards eliminating human rights violations against the planet’s 370 million indigenous people,  and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation.

The Declaration sets out the individual and collective rights of indigenous peoples, as well as their rights to culture, identity, language, employment, health, education and other issues.

It also “emphasizes the rights of indigenous peoples to maintain and strengthen their own institutions, cultures and traditions, and to pursue their development in keeping with their own needs and aspirations”.

It “prohibits discrimination against indigenous peoples”, and it “promotes their full and effective participation in all matters that concern them and their right to remain distinct and to pursue their own visions of economic and social development”

Nubian Village along Nile

The Declaration was over 22 years in the making. The idea originated in 1982 when the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) set up its Working Group on Indigenous Populations (WGIP), established as a result of a study by Special Rapporteur José R. Martínez Cobo on the problem of discrimination faced by indigenous peoples.

Tasked with developing human rights standards that would protect indigenous peoples, in 1985 the Working Group began working on drafting the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The draft was finished in 1993 and was submitted to the Sub-Commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities, which gave its approval the following year.

The Draft Declaration was then referred to the Commission on Human Rights, which established another Working Group to examine its terms. Over the following years this Working Group met on 11 occasions to examine and fine-tune the Draft Declaration and its provisions.

Progress was slow because of certain states’ concerns regarding some key provisions of the Declaration, such as

indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination and the control over natural resources existing on indigenous peoples’ traditional lands.

The final version of the Declaration was adopted on 29 June 2006 by the 47-member Human Rights Council (the successor body to the Commission on Human Rights), with 30 member states in favour, two against, 12 abstentions, and three absentees.

The Declaration was then referred to the General Assembly,

which voted on the adoption of the proposal on 13 September 2007 during its 61st regular session.

The vote was 143 countries in favour,  4 against, and 11 abstaining.

The four member states that voted against were:

Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the “United States”, each of which have

significant “indigenous populations”.

Nubian Woman

The abstaining countries were:

Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burundi, Colombia, Georgia, Kenya, Nigeria, Russian Federation, Samoa and Ukraine;

another 34 member states were absent from the vote.

The U.S. mission also issued a floor document, “Observations of the United States with respect to

the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, setting out its objections to the Declaration. Most of these are based on the same points as the other three countries’ rejections but, in addition,

the United States drew attention to the Declaration’s failure to provide a clear definition of exactly whom

the term “indigenous peoples” is intended to cover.

Nubian Bride copy

Nubian Merchants

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Nubian Cultures in crisis : The Aswan Dam… By: Dr. Georgianna Short

Posted in African Diaspora, Afro Arabs, afro asiatic, Declaration of the Rights of indigenous people, Do you have a Nationality ?, Egypt, Nile Valley/Nubia, Nubian Displaced @ Aswan/Egypt, Nubians with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2009 by Biléh* Gambéla በላይ ። ጋምበላ🇺🇸🇸🇩🇨🇻

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nubian-cuz

Cultures in Crisis: Impact of Forced Relocation on Sustainability of Culture…

By: Dr. Georgianna Short

All cultures experience catastrophic events at some point in their history. Some cultures are able to survive these challenges,

ensuring traditional practice for future generations. Other cultures, overwhelmed by events, survive by adapting traditional

routine to immediate circumstance. Over time adaptations, once considered temporary, can override traditions and customs associated with daily life.

Sustainability of customs/traditions of daily life depend upon generational ability to safeguard tangible and intangible heritage.

Tangible heritage is “a descriptor [for] any and all human-constructed or human mediated objects…” the material goods of culture (Bolin & Blandy, 2003, p. 249).

Intangible cultural heritage consists of “practices, presentations, expressions,

Knowledge and skills that communities [and]…groups recognize as part of their cultural heritage” (UNESCO, 2005).

Catastrophic events place both tangible and intangible heritage at risk.

Post-crisis examination of tangible and intangible cultural indicators can provide insight into what is considered valuable by present

Members of a Cultural group, whether/how valuable possessions reflect traditional values, and to what degree ancestral heritage will be

Sustained for Future Generations.

This paper explores traditions and customs of three geographically  distinct cultures threatened by catastrophic water events and

Forced relocation during the last half-century; identifies how each event threatened cultural heritage of the effected group; and traces

consequences of aftermath conditions on group’s ability to sustain/maintain its cultural roots. Cultures examined include

the Nubian people evicted from their homeland during the Nubian Aswan Dam crisis (1965-1971),

Chinese peasant population uprooted by the Three Gorges Dam Project (1994-2009),

and plight of displaced poor in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina (2005).

Dr. Short is interested in studying factors affecting sustainability of tangible and intangible heritage of disenfranchised minority groups.

Dr. Short spent 20 years studying cultural sustainability of Guatemalan Highland peoples and subsequently became involved with UNESCO’s World Heritage sites in Egypt, Africa and China.

Dr. Short’s uses catastrophic events of recent history as a lens through which to view ways disenfranchised groups sustain cultural capitol in contemporary times.

bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109…

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